Graduate Courses, Fall 2016

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ARTHIST 590R: Methods and the Profession

Cronan----Tuesday 12:00 - 3:00 PM----Carlos Hall Conference Room---Max: 10

Content: This class is designed as an orientation to the historiography, methods and profession of Art History. We will address primary texts, sample the approaches and contributions of various art historians to the field, and make occasional trips to museums, symposia, and the Rare Book room in Woodruff Library.

Texts: TBA

Assessment: TBA

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ARTHIST 592G: Examining Materials and Techniques

Stein---------Thursday 1:00 - 4:00 PM ----------Tate Room----------Max: 5

Content: Questions about material choice, working process, authenticity, provenance, and restoration are all addressed through the technical investigation of art.  This course will introduce students to these questions and to a selection of the methods used to explore them.  Students will gain hands-on experience with art materials and examination methods while accomplishing technical studies of objects in the Carlos Museum collection.

Texts: TBA

Assessment: TBA

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ARTHIST 592H: Introduction to Graphics and Computer-Aided Design

Shpuza---------Tuesday 5:00 - 8:00 PM ----------S108 Callaway Center----------Max: 4

Content: This course is designed to provide students interested in architecture with a basic understanding of computer-aided design and graphic analysis. Emphasizing a hands-on approach, the course is structured around two projects which are designed to let students explore the potential of the computer, not merely as a drafting and presentation instrument but as an active analytical and design aid. Permission required prior to enrollment.

Texts: TBA

Particulars: Students will be responsible for reading and class discussion, as well as projects that will have significant research and visualization components, resulting in a final paper.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ARTHIST 596R: Internship in Art History

Coordinator: Faculty

May be repeated with permission from the director of internships. Interns must be nominated by the department for internships at the Michael C. Carlos Museum, the High Museum of Art, and elsewhere. Variable credit.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ARTHIST 597R: Directed Study

Faculty; variable credit.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ARTHIST 599R: Thesis Research (Permission only)

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ARTHIST 719R: Images of the Cosmos: Temples, Tombs and Palaces in Ancient Egypt

Robins----Friday 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM----Carlos Hall Conference Room----Max: 10

Content: The unique way in which the ancient Egyptians envisaged the universe is preserved in their creation myths, funerary beliefs, and notions of kingship. Their view of the cosmos was also embodied in the architecture and decoration of temples, tombs (both royal and non-royal) and palaces. In this course, we will explore how such monuments reflect and give concrete expression to the structure of the universe, and examine their role in perpetuating the created world through the act of their construction, their architectural and decorative programs, and the rituals performed within them. We will also consider how the embodied cosmos contributed to the effective functioning of the monuments. The course will include visits to the Carlos Museum.

Texts:  Selected readings.

Assessment: Students will be responsible for the presentation and discussion of weekly readings; a preliminary and final oral presentation of a research topic; a 16-20 page, double spaced, 12-point research paper together with an abstract of the paper.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ARTHIST 729: The Hellenistic World

Wescoat----Thursday 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM----Carlos Hall Conference Room----Max: 10

Content: Alexander’s conquests toppled the anciently configured eastern Mediterranean world; his successors were left to reassemble the pieces. In this course we will explore the artistic production shaped by the cultural, social, political, and religious forces that gave the resulting “Hellenistic” world its dynamic character. Themes will include the changing shape of sacred space and religious experience, the crafting of art forms for urban life across diverse regions and ethnicities, the role of rulers as patrons, and the artistic traditions of ordinary life. The Hellenistic period is vast and rich; in one semester we cannot hope to plum its depths. We aim to work especially with topics that offer a rich opportunity to examine the interaction of art and historical circumstance. Students will have the opportunity to explore subjects of particular interest in their research papers.

Recommended Texts: TBA

Assessment: TBA

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ARTHIST 735: Spanish Colonial Art through an Indigenous Lens

Wingfield---Wednesday 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM----Carlos Museum Tate Room----Max: 10

Content: Native contributions to Spanish Colonial art have long been known, particularly with regard to artistic skill -- from Aztec featherwork in Mexico to elaborate gold and silver casting in the Andes to woodcarving throughout the Americas. Yet indigenous beliefs incorporated into this syncretic art often allude scholars steeped in Western traditions. Recent archaeological and especially art historical research of native art and cultures from the American Southwest through the southern Andes provides deep background for reinterpreting Spanish Colonial art through an indigenous lens. This undergraduate/graduate course will explore the latest understandings of Spanish Colonial art from New Mexico to Chile with the intent to produce more fresh interpretations through student projects.

Texts: TBA

Assessment: TBA

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ARTHIST 739R: Visualizing the Medieval Cult of Saints

Pastan----Wednesday 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM----Carlos Hall Conference Room----Max: 10


Content: This course focuses on the medieval cult of saints, and we will read studies by historians, art historians and theologians. Our investigations will include classic studies by Peter Brown, Emile Mâle, and Benedicta Ward and along with more recent work on the subject, including Sherry Reames, Cynthia Hahn, and Julia M. H. Smith. Besides the inherent interest of how a site or cult chose to present itself in poignant and relatable narratives and imagery of the saints, two issues of approach will be emphasized.  Since saints’ narratives have long been a topic of interest for historians and scholars of theology, a first question is, what is the contribution of the relatively newer work in art history to the study of hagiography?  Related to this, in view of the interest of current work on materiality and on topographies of sacred space, are there certain kinds of objects, materials, locations, or strategies that are particularly effective in relaying saintly biography or involving the beholder?

Texts: TBA

Assessment: TBA

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ARTHIST 759R: Emblematic Theory and Practice in the Low Countries, 1550-1700

Melion----Tuesday 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM----Carlos Hall Conference Room----Max: 10

Content: We will be studying the form, function, and argument of emblem books produced in the Low Countries—mainly Antwerp and Amsterdam—between the mid-sixteenth and late seventeenth centuries.  The term emblematum/emblemata was coined by the jurist Andrea Alciato in 1522: he used it to designate a novel literary device—the witty and erudite pairing of a motto with an epigrammatic commentary.  In commenting on the motto, the epigram often makes use of verbal images, and perhaps as a result, one of the earliest (unauthorized) printings of Alciati’s manuscript Emblemata (Augsburg: Heinrich Steyner, 1531) translate verba into picturae, incorporating woodcut illustrations, interpolated not by Alciato, but by the publisher.  Whereas the original Emblemata were erudite, festive, and occasionally ribald, the illustrated versions issued in Southern Germany and France (mainly Lyons) utilized pictures to appeal to a much wider public of reader-viewers.

Texts: Please see the link to the syllabus.

Assessment: TBA

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ARTHIST 790: Teaching Art History

Merrill----Wednesday 1:00 - 2:50 PM----Carlos Hall Conference Room----MAX: 10

Content: ARTHIST 790/791 is designed to meet the Graduate School (TATTO) requirement for a teacher training course for students in art history. It is required of those graduate students serving as TAs in ARTHIST 101/102, and is offered in concert with their teaching experience in those courses.

Texts: Stokstad and Cothren, Art History, 5th ed.

Assessment: TBA

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ARTHIST 796R: Internship in Art History

Coordinator: Faculty
May be repeated with permission from the director of internships. Interns must be nominated by the department for internships at the Michael C. Carlos Museum, the High Museum of Art, and elsewhere. Variable credit.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ARTHIST 797R: Directed Study

Coordinator: Faculty
Variable credit (1-12)

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ARTHIST 798R: Exam Preparation

Coordinator: Faculty
Variable credit (1-12)

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ARTHIST 799R: Dissertation Research

Coordinator: Faculty