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Todd Cronan

Todd Cronan

Todd Cronan

Assistant Professor

Art History Department
Emory University
M27 Carlos Hall
Atlanta, GA 30322

404-727-0513

todd.cronan@emory.edu

Curriculum Vitae

www.toddcronan.net

TODD CRONAN (Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 2005)

Research Interests

European Art between 1880 and 1950; Matisse & Picasso; the international avant-garde between 1914 and 1923; philosophical and theoretical problems around intention, chance, affect, form and skepticism.

Selected Publications

Books

Against Affective Formalism: Matisse, Bergson, Modernism (Spring 2014)

Matisse (forthcoming in spring 2015 from Phaidon Books)

Articles

Response to Kaja Silverman's The Miracle of Analogy, nonsite.org (Spring 2014)

“The Political Ontology of Unemployment: Why No One Need Apply” nonsite.org 10 (Fall 2013)

“‘‘Seeing Differently’ and ‘Seeing Correctly’: Bertolt Brecht For and Against Abstraction,” Brecht Yearbook, vol. 37, ed. Theodore Rippey (Dec. 2013)

Art and Political Consequence: Brecht and the Problem of Affect,” Special issue on Bertolt Brecht, nonsite.org 10 (Fall 2013)

“On Previsualization,” co-written with James Welling, in See the Light: Photography, Perception, Cognition, ed. Britt Salvesen (Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 2013)



“Photography & Chance,” entry, Encyclopedia of Aesthetics, new edition, Oxford UP, 2014



“Paul Valéry,” entry, Encyclopedia of Aesthetics, new edition, Oxford UP, 2014

“‘Danger in the Smallest Dose’: Richard Neutra’s Design Theory,” Design and Culture, 3:2 (July 2011): 165-191

"Money is in the Eye of the Beholder," editorial, nonsite.org (Summer 2011)

Paul Valéry’s Blood Meridian, Or How the Reader became a Writer,” nonsite.org 1 (February 2011)

"Merleau-Ponty, Santayana and the Paradoxes of Animal Faith," British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18:3 (2010): 487–506

"Georg Simmel's Timeless Impressionism," New German Critique 106 (2009): 83-101

"'Primordial Automatism': George Santayana's Later Aesthetics," Overheard in Seville 25 (2007): 20-27

"Looking Into Surfaces," in David D. Kim (ed.), Georg Simmel in Translation, (Cambridge Scholars Press,2006), 229-261

Translation and Introduction to Max Horkheimer, "Schopenhauer and Society," qui parle 15:1 (2004): 81-96

Reviews

“The Meaning of Pain: Paul Scheerbart's Lesabéndio,” Radical Philosophy 185 (May/June 2014): 64-65

“Photography at the End of Modernism,” review of Aperture Magazine Anthology—The Minor White Years, 1952-1976, History of Photography (spring 2014)

Neoliberal Art History,” review of David Joselit, After Art. Radical Philosophy 180 (July/Aug. 2013): 50-53

Review of T. J. Clark, Picasso and Truth: From Cubism to Guernica. Los Angeles Review of Books (Spring 2014)

Literally Conceptual,” review of Lisa Siraganian, Modernism’s Other Work. Radical Philosophy 177 (Jan./Feb. 2013): 51-54



“The Theater of Censored Poverty,” Responses and reply to Cronan, “You are all proletarians,” nonsite.org (Fall 2012)

"You are all proletarians," Review of Adorno and Horkheimer, Towards a New Manifesto, Radical Philosophy 174 (July/August 2012), pp. 31-33

"Radically Private and Pretty Uncoded," Review of Affect Theory ReaderRadical Philosophy 172 (March/April 2012), pp. 51-53

Mysterious Exchange: On Susan Sidlauskas’s Cézanne’s Other: The Portraits of Hortense,” nonsite.org 1 (February 2011)

Review Essay of Michael Fried's Menzel's Realism: Art and Embodiment in 19th Century Berlin, Zeitschrift fur Kunstgeschichte 4 (2006): 578-92

Clement Greenberg's Late Writings, qui parle 14:2 (2004): 205-12

"Shaken Realism," Review Essay of Michael Fried, Menzel's Realism, qui parle 14:1 (2003): 123-58

Current Projects

Contributing Editor to nonsite.org

Translation (with Bridget Alsdorf) of Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe's "Ecrits sur l'art" (forthcoming from Fordham University Press)

Professor Cronan is currently at work on two book projects. The first, Seeing Photographically: Photographic Ontology and the Problem of Audience, looks at photographic debates around the concept of "previsualization" from Alfred Stieglitz to Minor White including new considerations of the work of Edward Weston, Ansel Adams, Harry Callahan and Aaron Siskind. The second project, Art at the End of History: Painting/Photography/Architecture/Theater/Film in the 1920s, examines the claims and results of a vision of art after modernization had achieved its ends. At the center of the latter are the intense debates over which artistic medium was thought to best express the realities of a post-historical world.